Dermatology Handbook

The professional's guide to product selection

Antifungals (oral)

Canesten Hydrocortisone

Canesten Hydrocortisone

Canesten Hydrocortisone is a combination of clotrimazole and hydrocortisone acetate. Clotrimazole belongs to a group of medicines called imidazoles, which destroy the fungi and some bacteria that cause skin infections. Hydrocortisone acetate is a mild steroid which reduces swelling, redness and itching associated with inflammation of the skin

Diflucan

Diflucan

Diflucan contains fluconazole, a triazole antifungal agent. Its primary mode of action is the inhibition of fungal cytochrome P-450-mediated 14 alpha-lanosterol demethylation, an essential step in fungal ergosterol biosynthesis. The accumulation of 14 alpha-methyl sterols correlates with the subsequent loss of ergosterol in the fungal cell membrane and may be responsible for the antifungal activity of fluconazole. Fluconazole has been shown to be more selective for fungal cytochrome P-450 enzymes than for various mammalian cytochrome P-450 enzyme systems

Lamisil

Lamisil

Terbinafine is an allylamine which has a broad spectrum of antifungal activity. At low concentrations terbinafine is fungicidal against dermatophytes, moulds and certain dimorphic fungi. The activity versus yeasts is fungicidal or fungistatic depending on the species. Terbinafine interferes specifically with fungal sterol biosynthesis at an early step. This leads to a deficiency in ergosterol and to an intracellular accumulation of squalene, resulting in fungal cell death

Sporanox

Sporanox

Sporanox is a triazole derivative with a broad spectrum of antifungal activity that inhibits the growth of a broad range of fungi that are pathogenic in humans